things are happening

theheavycollective:

B E N J A M I N - J A Y - S H A N D - F O R M - F O L L O W S 

Benjamin Jay Shand’s photo series Form Follows launches this Thursday at Sydney’s M2 Gallery. If meticulously framed urban landscapes and punch in the face colours get you going, then make a visit top priority. 

"This show will highlight a series of photographs, exposed on 35mm film, which the artist culled from an archive of thousands of negatives amassed over months of travel. Occupying the walls of his Brooklyn studio in the early months of 2013, Shand scrutinised each composition carefully selecting the occupants of this series".

Opening 6pm 24 April, 2014, on view 24 April – 4 May, 2014. M2 Gallery 4/450 Elizabeth st, Surry Hills, sydney

softpyramid:

Robert RauschenbergEarth Day1970collage and offset litho (300 signed, 10,000 unsigned)Benefit print for the American Environment Foundation

softpyramid:

Robert Rauschenberg
Earth Day
1970
collage and offset litho (300 signed, 10,000 unsigned)
Benefit print for the American Environment Foundation

softpyramid:

Edward Burtynsky
China
2007-2012

"Mass consumerism and the resulting degradation of our environment intrinsic to the process of making things to keep us happy and fulfilled frightens me. I no longer see my world as delineated by countries, with borders, or language, but as 7 billion humans living off a single, finite planet.” - Edward Burtynsky

amamblog:

Gerhard Richter grew up behind the Iron Curtain. Educated in East Germany, he is best known for his oversized photorealist paintings and bright gestural abstractions. While his photorealism may be tied to his formative training in the Socialist Realist style, his abstract canvases oppose the Communist veto of modernist forms of expression. As a student at the mural painting division of the Dresden Fine Arts Academy, Richter acquired superb technical skills, but detested the uniformity and restrictions imposed on artistic creativity. After defecting to West Germany in 1961, he began painting from photographs and founded the group Capitalist Realism, which sought to capture the nature of West Germany’s capitalist reality.
Based on a 1969 snapshot the artist took on the Canary Islands, Seelandschaft deploys a key trope of Socialist Realist landscapes—the prominent inclusion of the horizon line—that symbolizes the utopian future to which all Socialist societies aspired. The golden, almost apocalyptic, glow of the sky, however, forecasts an impending cataclysm rather than an earthly paradise. Moreover, the low-hanging clouds together with the forbidding wall of waves in the foreground produce a claustrophobic effect. What at first appears to be an infinite space emerges as a closed-off world, like the one Richter had left behind—a world in which no one could travel, or speak, freely.Now on view in the exhibition “The Legacy of Socialist Realism" through June 22, 2014.Image: Gerhard Richter (German, born 1932)Seelandschaft (Ocean), 1971Color photogravureArt Rental Collection Transfer, 1995.1

amamblog:

Gerhard Richter grew up behind the Iron Curtain. Educated in East Germany, he is best known for his oversized photorealist paintings and bright gestural abstractions. While his photorealism may be tied to his formative training in the Socialist Realist style, his abstract canvases oppose the Communist veto of modernist forms of expression. As a student at the mural painting division of the Dresden Fine Arts Academy, Richter acquired superb technical skills, but detested the uniformity and restrictions imposed on artistic creativity. After defecting to West Germany in 1961, he began painting from photographs and founded the group Capitalist Realism, which sought to capture the nature of West Germany’s capitalist reality.

Based on a 1969 snapshot the artist took on the Canary Islands, Seelandschaft deploys a key trope of Socialist Realist landscapes—the prominent inclusion of the horizon line—that symbolizes the utopian future to which all Socialist societies aspired. The golden, almost apocalyptic, glow of the sky, however, forecasts an impending cataclysm rather than an earthly paradise. Moreover, the low-hanging clouds together with the forbidding wall of waves in the foreground produce a claustrophobic effect. What at first appears to be an infinite space emerges as a closed-off world, like the one Richter had left behind—a world in which no one could travel, or speak, freely.

Now on view in the exhibition “The Legacy of Socialist Realism" through June 22, 2014.

Image: 
Gerhard Richter (German, born 1932)
Seelandschaft (Ocean), 1971
Color photogravure
Art Rental Collection Transfer, 1995.1

f-l-e-u-r-d-e-l-y-s:

Elisa Strozyk

Wooden. Rugs. Rolls those two words around in your mind hole for a minute or two. German artist Elisa Strozyk has created three variations of these delightful coverings. Strozyk dyes and connects row upon row of triangular pieces as she pulls together the end result of a colored wooden rug, which is so flexible that you can literally crumple it up and toss it into a corner. (via Design Milk)


(via exhibition-ism)

erin-omalley:

Darkroom experiments. I’m not sure if I could classify this as a photogram because I used an enlarger to project & print transparencies that I had painted on, similar to making film prints but without the actual film. This one maybe I won’t draw over 

erin-omalley:

Darkroom experiments. I’m not sure if I could classify this as a photogram because I used an enlarger to project & print transparencies that I had painted on, similar to making film prints but without the actual film. This one maybe I won’t draw over 

iovblog:

Solarium by William Lamson

Мини-теплица для цитрусовых растеньиц из стеклянных панелей с загерметизированной внутри них карамелью.

Like a mountain chapel or Thoreau’s one-room cabin, Solarium references a tradition of isolated outposts designed for reflection. Each of the 162 panels is made of sugar cooked to different temperatures and then sealed between two panes of window glass.

IOV Blog: website | twitter | facebook | vk | rss

theatlantic:

This Man Took 445 Photobooth Portraits of Himself Over 30 Years, and Nobody Knows Why

For three decades, starting in the 1930s, he did the same thing. He’d sit inside a photo booth. He’d smile. He’d pose. 
And then—pop! pop! pop!—out would pop a glossy self-portrait, in shades of black and white. There he was, staring back at himself … and grinning. And, sometimes, almost scowling. There he was, mirthful. And, sometimes, almost scornful.  
The man—nobody knows who he was—repeated this process 455 times, at least, and he did so well into the 1960s. Nobody knows for sure why he did it. Or where he did it. All we know is that he took nearly 500 self-portraits over the course of thirty years, at a time when taking self-portraits was significantly more difficult than it is today, creating a striking record of the passage of time. 
The man’s effort is now being shared with the public in the form of a collection being shown at Rutgers’ Zimmerli Art Museum in New Brunswick. “445 Portraits of a Man,” the exhibit is appropriately called, takes these early, earnest selfies and presents them as art. 
Read more. [Image courtesy Donald Lokuta]

theatlantic:

This Man Took 445 Photobooth Portraits of Himself Over 30 Years, and Nobody Knows Why

For three decades, starting in the 1930s, he did the same thing. He’d sit inside a photo booth. He’d smile. He’d pose. 

And then—pop! pop! pop!—out would pop a glossy self-portrait, in shades of black and white. There he was, staring back at himself … and grinning. And, sometimes, almost scowling. There he was, mirthful. And, sometimes, almost scornful.  

The man—nobody knows who he was—repeated this process 455 times, at least, and he did so well into the 1960s. Nobody knows for sure why he did it. Or where he did it. All we know is that he took nearly 500 self-portraits over the course of thirty years, at a time when taking self-portraits was significantly more difficult than it is today, creating a striking record of the passage of time. 

The man’s effort is now being shared with the public in the form of a collection being shown at Rutgers’ Zimmerli Art Museum in New Brunswick. “445 Portraits of a Man,” the exhibit is appropriately called, takes these early, earnest selfies and presents them as art.

Read more. [Image courtesy Donald Lokuta]

(via npr)

artruby:

Tauba Auerbach, Shatter series, (2009). 

MGM

MGM

John Paul White and Candi Staton perform together at the Alabama Music hall of Fame induction banquet in Florence, AL on feb. 28,2014